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America's Stonehenge - Georgia Guidestones (Read 273 times)
Webbie
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America's Stonehenge - Georgia Guidestones
Mar 23rd, 2010, 7:57am
 
http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/03/22/georgia.mystery.monument/?hpt=C2


Elberton, Georgia (CNN) -- In the beginning, there was the stone.

The blue-gray vein of granite that courses through northeastern Georgia spawned jobs in the quarries and finishing sheds of Elberton, where generations of stonecutters have turned slabs of rock the size of refrigerators into statues, tombstones and tile.

And one day, it brought a visitor who gifted the town with a landmark that leaves visitors scratching their heads decades later.

The nearly 20-foot high series of granite slabs known as the Georgia Guidestones are inscribed with a series of admonitions for a future "Age of Reason." Billed as "America's Stonehenge," it's an astronomically complex, 120-ton relic of Cold War fears, built to instruct survivors of an Armageddon that the mystery man feared was all too near.

The identity of the man who called himself "R.C. Christian" is a secret that Wyatt Martin, the banker who acted as his agent in Elberton, vows to take to his grave.

"He told me, 'If you were to tell who put the money up for this, it wouldn't be a mystery any more, and no one would come and read it.' That had to be part of the attraction, to get people to come and read his 10 rules that he came up with," Martin said.

People in Elberton, about 100 miles east of Atlanta, are proud of their eccentric landmark. But 30 years after its dedication, it has drawn the attention of a new generation of conspiracy theorists with very different fears.

"There are a lot of people who don't feel about it the same way we do," said Phyllis Brooks, president of the Elbert County Chamber of Commerce.

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More at the link above.

Pretty weird stuff.

Makes you wonder if he was a time traveler and needed this info in the future.

Imagine aliens finding these after WWIII, what would they think?

For that matter what did the locals think when it was being built?

What would you think if somebody built that near you?

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